Blog RSS

new product -

The Garlic press is a much maligned apparatus.  Many chefs are on record referring to them as abominations and worse, and we get it: single use kitchen tools can be a pain to use/clean and most should be replaced with proper technique and the knife and cutting board you're already using. The garlic press is different, and here's why: The characteristic flavor and aroma of garlic is the result of Allicin, an extremely volatile organosulfur compound.  And here's the thing: there is no Allicin in a clove of garlic. This is because Allicin only forms when Alliin and Alliinase (two...

Read more

new product -

In the Fall of 2018, Cleve Oines seasoned 4 steaks with salt and freshly ground black pepper.   It took 73 cranks of the pepper mill. At crank 10, Cleve wondered if there was a better way.  Pre ground pepper degrades rapidly once ground, so it isn't an ideal option. At crank 20, he adjusted his pepper mill to the "COARSE" setting in order to increase the output.  The difference was imperceptible. At crank 30, he wondered why there was such wide variation in grind size, with huge chunks of pepper popping ponderously from the pepper mill preceding particulates of petite...

Read more

According to a recent study, from 1965 to 2008 the percentage of US men who cook at home increased by 44.8%.  Time spent by men preparing meals in that same period also increased by over 20%. With the workplace migrating to the home, and more dual-income households than ever before, more men are spending more time in the kitchen today than at any period in history.   Introducing a kitchen tool for the new era, the MÄNNKITCHEN MK9: Built for the man that loves to cook. Männ is the masculine possessive word for "my" in a dialect of old Norse.  My kitchen = MÄNNKITCHEN.  The profile...

Read more

Maillard sounds like my-yar. The French like to use a lot of unpronounced letters.  On the other hand, they also use a lot of butter, so they get a pass. The Maillard Reaction is named after Louis-Camille Maillard, a French chemist who was studying the "browning effect" in 1912. Essentially, the Maillard reaction is responsible for the flavors and aromas created when food is heated enough that the amino acids and sugars start to dance together.  The sweet spot is 280-330F with the reaction accelerating the hotter (or more alkaline) it is.   If you leave your food at these temps too long, you...

Read more

There’s two basic types of cast iron cooks: One spends days meticulously seasoning their cast iron in the oven with layers of unrefined flax seed oil. It’s a lot of work. As a result, they tend to be very careful to protect that layer of seasoning and only use soft implements on it.  I understand this mindset, and bamboo or silicon implements may be best for them. The other type of cast iron cook believes that the best seasoning method for cast iron is frequent use with a variety of oils, high heat, and a flat edged stainless steel spatula....

Read more